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2 edition of Ovulation in the four-toed salamander, Hemidactylium scutatum found in the catalog.

Ovulation in the four-toed salamander, Hemidactylium scutatum

Rufus Richard Humphrey

Ovulation in the four-toed salamander, Hemidactylium scutatum

and the external features of cleavage and gastrulation.

by Rufus Richard Humphrey

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  • 13 Currently reading

Published in (Wood"s Hole, Mass.) .
Written in English


Edition Notes

From Biological bulletin, 54.

Other titlesBiological bulletin.
The Physical Object
PaginationPp. 307-323
Number of Pages323
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20194082M

Four-toed Salamander. Hemidactylium scutatum (Schlegel) This is our least common species. Most reports are from south central Nova Scotia, but the creature is small and secretive and easily overlooked. More reports would be very welcome. The Four-toed Salamander is orange to reddish brown above with patches of black spots. Hemidactylium Tschudi Four-toed salamander Hemidactylium Tschudi, Type-species Salam.­ [andra] scutata Schlegel in Temminck, Schlegel, & de Haan [] , by monotypy. Cotobotes Gistel, xi. Replacement name for Hem­ idactylium, proposed in the erroneous belief that Hemidactylium was preoccupied by Hemidactylus Oken,

1. Introduction. Hemidactylium scutatum (Caudata: Plethodontidae) is a small, four-toed salamander distributed throughout eastern North America. Characteristic of the family Plethodontidae, members of the genus Hemidactylium lack lungs and possess nasolabial grooves. As the sole species of the genus Hemidactylium and the monotypic tribe Hemidactyliini (one of four tribes of the subfamily Cited by: 2. Hemidactylium scutatum: Crawford County: Hemidactylium scutatum: Crawford County: Hemidactylium scutatum: Union County: Hemidactylium scutatum: Westmoreland County: Hemidactylium scutatum: Indiana County: Hemidactylium scutatum: Crawford County.

Normal table of embryonic development in the four-toed salamander, Hemidactylium scutatum Article in Mechanisms of Development January with 91 Reads How we measure 'reads'. R.N. Harris, D.E. GillCommunal nesting, brooding behavior, and embryonic survival of the four-toed salamander Hemidactylium scutatum Herpetologica, 36 (2) (), pp. Google ScholarCited by:


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Ovulation in the four-toed salamander, Hemidactylium scutatum by Rufus Richard Humphrey Download PDF EPUB FB2

Hemidactylium scutatum Temminck and Schlegel, Four-Toed Salamander. Reid N. Harris 1. Historical versus Current Distribution.

The current knowledge of distribution of four-toed salamanders (Hemidactylium scutatum) is summarized in Petranka (); four-toed salamanders range from southeastern Canada south to the Gulf of Mexico and west to Oklahoma, Missouri, and Wisconsin.

Four-toed Salamander. Scientific Name: Hemidactylium scutatum. Etymology: Genus: hemi is Greek for "half", daktylion is Greek and means "fusion of digits". Referring to the reduced number of digits on the hind feet. Species: scutatum is Latin meaning "armed with a shield". Referring to the costal grooves which appeared to be covered with shield.

Four-toed Salamander. Scientific Name: Hemidactylium scutatum Size: 2 – 4” (adult length) Status: Generally uncommon, with populations localized. Habitat: Occupy moist deciduous, coniferous, or mixed woodlands, often near spring-feed creeks, bogs, or boggy ponds. The Four-toed Salamander Photos By Michael Redmer With better understanding of the species came discoveries of new populations of a northern glacial relict.

January Outdoor Illinois / 13 Adult Adult at. Native Status. Hemidactylium scutatum (Four-toed Salamander) is native to Missouri. Collection Summary. Hemidactylium scutatum (Four-toed Salamander) has a total of 45 valid, non-duplicated collections representing 16 counties and 31 are a total of 37 collectors and 29 collection dates for the species.

This results in a total of 34 expeditions for the species, a measure of. Overview Overview. Four-toed Salamander (Hemidactylium scutatum), a Special Concern species, prefers northern and southern hardwood forests and to a lesser degree, conifer overwinters from November through late March by burrowing underground to avoid freezing.

Mating can occur in fall or spring at breeding ponds, seepage pools or springs. The four-toed salamander is a small, lungless salamander only 5 to cm (2 to 4 in) in length. It is a rusty brown color or gray-brown color with grayish sides. It is often speckled with black and bluish spots.

Unique four-toed hind feet and a constricted ring around the base of its tail easily identify it. Distribution of the Four-toed Salamander (from the AR MI Atlas) An adult Four-toed Salamander.

Description: A small (>4”) woodland salamander easily identified by three characteristics: four toes on each hindfoot (unique among Ohio’s terrestrial salamanders), distinct constriction band around base of tail, and ivory white belly with.

Four-Toed Salamander - Hemidactylium scutatum Overview: This salamander is rare and irregularly distributed across Ohio because it requires the special habitat of forests surrounding bogs.

Characteristics Diagnosis. Hemidactylium scutatum is readily identified by having only four toes on each hindfoot, a constriction around the base of the tail, and a boldly patterned venter that is white with black blotches. Detailed Characteristics of the Subfamily Hemidactylinae.

Characteristics are summarized from Lombard and Wake's () phylogenetic analysis of major plethodontid. Description: Length ranges from inches ( cm).

Coloration is reddish brown or brown above with silver flecking on the sides. The belly is porcelain white with small, but bold, black spots scattered randomly about the venter. There are four toes on the front and hind feet, and it is the only terrestrial salamander with four toes on each foot.

Photo by Todd Pierson. Hemidactylium scutatum. Listed: State Species of Special Concern. Description: The four-toed salamander is a fairly small salamander with the unmistakeable combination of four toes on each rear foot, a constriction at the base of the tail, and a white belly with bold black spots.

The back is mottled brown and the sides of the body are grayish with some light flecking. The four-toed salamander, Hemidactylium scutatum, is one of Arkansas' disjunct amphibians, separated from its primary range in the eastern United States and Canada (Conant, ).

Hemidactylium is con-sidered rare by the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission (ANIIC)and is considered a sensitive species by the United States Forest Service (USDA Cited by: 1. Four-toed Salamander (Hemidactylium scutatum) - text pg. 35 ˘ ˇ ˆ ˘˙ ˇ ˝ ˛ Four-toed Salamander (Hemidactylium scutatum) - Pl Identification: 2" - 4".

The Four-toed Salamander has a brown back and gray sides, with dark speckles on the back and sides. It has three key identifying characteristics.

View all records for Hemidactylium scutatum The Michigan Herp Atlas began in in an effort to collect observational data about Michigan's amphibians and reptiles. Our goal is to document their distribution and help measure changes or trends in populations.

Octo Four-toed Salamander Hemidactylium scutatum. vouchered record, post county boundaries county subdivisions Ecological Provinces Laurentian Mixed Forest Eastern Broadleaf Forest. The Four-toed salamander (Hemidactylium scutatum), is a minute species of plethodontid (lungless salamander).

It is a monotypic species, being the sole representative of the Hemidactylium genus. Their range extends from southeastern Canada down through to the Gulf of Mexico.

Populations also exist to the west, in Oklahoma, Missouri, and Wisconsin. Four-toed Salamander - Hemidactylium scutatum *The colored areas of the map above represent parishes with currently known records for the given species (Source: Jeff Boundy, LA Dept. of. Discover How Long Four-toed salamander Lives.

OUR DATA: We use the most recent data from these primary sources: AnAge, UMICH, Max Planck, PanTHERIA, Arkive, UKC, AKC.

Genus: Hemidactylium Species Hemidactylium scutatum Common name Four-toed salamander Lifespan, ageing, and relevant traits Maximum longevity years (captivity) Source ref.

Sample size Small Data quality Acceptable Observations No observations. Four-toed Salamander (Hemidactylium scutatum) is an extremely small, slender species, frequently associated with Sphagnum moss in boggy habitats.

The common name refers to the fact that the hind feet have only four toes, while most salamander species have five. Adult Four-toed are primarily terrestrial, while the larvae are aquatic.

Size: Two to four inches. Color: Upper surface reddish brown, fading to dull gray on the sides. Underside, bluish white with black spots. Where found: Mainly terrestrial; in swamps, marshes.Four-toed Salamander. Hemidactylium scutatum. 1.